Pride is therefore, as St. Augustine says, a perverse love of greatness; it leads us to imitate God in a wrong way, by not bearing with the equality of our fellow men and by wishing to impose our domination on them, instead of living with them in humble submission to the Divine law. 
 "Esteem not thyself better than others, lest perhaps thou be accounted worse in the sight of God. … What pleaseth men, oftentimes displeaseth Him. … Continual peace dwelleth with the humble; but in the heart of the proud is frequent envy, indignation, and resentment…" 
( Excerpt from The Imitation, Book I, Chapter 12).
 Pride then is a bandage over the eyes of the spirit, which hinders us from seeing the truth, especially that relative to the majesty of God and the excellence of those who surpass us. It prevents us from wishing to be instructed by them, or it prompts us not to accept direction without argument. Pride thus perverts our life as one would bend a spring; it hinders us from asking light from God, Who consequently hides His truth from the proud. Pride turns us away, therefore, from the affective knowledge of Divine truth, from contemplation, to which humility, on the contrary, disposes us. Therefore Christ says: “I confess to Thee, O Father, Lord of Heaven and earth, because Thou hast hidden these things from the wise and prudent and hast revealed them to little ones.” Spiritual pride is most powerful in turning us away from the contemplation of Divine things. With this meaning, St. Paul writes: “Knowledge puffeth up; but charity edifieth.”
Thus to reach true humility of mind and heart, a profound purification is needed. That which we impose on ourselves is not sufficient; there must be a passive purification by the light of the gifts of the Holy Ghost, which causes the bandage of pride to fall away, opens our eyes, shows us the depth of frailty and wretchedness that exists in us, the utility of adversity and humiliation, and finally makes us say to the Lord: “It is good for me that Thou hast humbled me, that I may learn Thy justifications.” ”It is good for us sometimes to suffer contradictions, and to allow people to think ill of us. … These are often helps to humility, and rid us of vainglory.”  It is in adversity that we can learn what we really are and what great need we have of God’s help: “What doth he know, that hath not been tried?” 
After this purification, pride and its effects will gradually be felt less. A person, instead of letting himself fall into jealousy and/or envy toward those who have more natural or supernatural qualities, tells himself then that, as St. Paul remarks, the hand ought not be jealous of the eye, but, on the contrary, it should be happy because it benefits from what the eye sees. The same is true in the mystical body of Christ; far from becoming envious, souls ought to enjoy in a holy manner the qualities they find in their neighbor. Though they do not possess them themselves, they benefit by them. They should rejoice over everything that cooperates in the glory of God and the good of souls. When this is the case, the bandage of pride falls away and the soul’s gaze recovers its simplicity and penetration, which make it enter little by little into the inner life of God. 
(Excerpts in totality from The Healing of Pride by Fr. Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.)

Pride is therefore, as St. Augustine says, a perverse love of greatness; it leads us to imitate God in a wrong way, by not bearing with the equality of our fellow men and by wishing to impose our domination on them, instead of living with them in humble submission to the Divine law. 

 "Esteem not thyself better than others, lest perhaps thou be accounted worse in the sight of God. … What pleaseth men, oftentimes displeaseth Him. … Continual peace dwelleth with the humble; but in the heart of the proud is frequent envy, indignation, and resentment…" 

( Excerpt from The Imitation, Book I, Chapter 12).

 Pride then is a bandage over the eyes of the spirit, which hinders us from seeing the truth, especially that relative to the majesty of God and the excellence of those who surpass us. It prevents us from wishing to be instructed by them, or it prompts us not to accept direction without argument. Pride thus perverts our life as one would bend a spring; it hinders us from asking light from God, Who consequently hides His truth from the proud. Pride turns us away, therefore, from the affective knowledge of Divine truth, from contemplation, to which humility, on the contrary, disposes us. Therefore Christ says: “I confess to Thee, O Father, Lord of Heaven and earth, because Thou hast hidden these things from the wise and prudent and hast revealed them to little ones.” Spiritual pride is most powerful in turning us away from the contemplation of Divine things. With this meaning, St. Paul writes: “Knowledge puffeth up; but charity edifieth.”

Thus to reach true humility of mind and heart, a profound purification is needed. That which we impose on ourselves is not sufficient; there must be a passive purification by the light of the gifts of the Holy Ghost, which causes the bandage of pride to fall away, opens our eyes, shows us the depth of frailty and wretchedness that exists in us, the utility of adversity and humiliation, and finally makes us say to the Lord: “It is good for me that Thou hast humbled me, that I may learn Thy justifications.” ”It is good for us sometimes to suffer contradictions, and to allow people to think ill of us. … These are often helps to humility, and rid us of vainglory.”  It is in adversity that we can learn what we really are and what great need we have of God’s help: “What doth he know, that hath not been tried?” 

After this purification, pride and its effects will gradually be felt less. A person, instead of letting himself fall into jealousy and/or envy toward those who have more natural or supernatural qualities, tells himself then that, as St. Paul remarks, the hand ought not be jealous of the eye, but, on the contrary, it should be happy because it benefits from what the eye sees. The same is true in the mystical body of Christ; far from becoming envious, souls ought to enjoy in a holy manner the qualities they find in their neighbor. Though they do not possess them themselves, they benefit by them. They should rejoice over everything that cooperates in the glory of God and the good of souls. When this is the case, the bandage of pride falls away and the soul’s gaze recovers its simplicity and penetration, which make it enter little by little into the inner life of God. 

(Excerpts in totality from The Healing of Pride by Fr. Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.)

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